Renunciation Defense to Criminal Conduct – Houston Criminal Lawyer James Sullivan can advise you


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Houston Criminal Lawyer James (Jim) Sullivan defends people accused of all kinds of criminal offenses and has successfully utilized many different kinds of defenses to get the best possible result.

James (Jim) Sullivan is an experienced Houston Criminal Defense Attorney. For over 20 years, Sullivan has successfully fought the government in Jury Trials on behalf of clients in criminal and juvenile courts.

James Sullivan attended the Trial Lawyers College founded by Legendary lawyer Gerry Spence and was invited to join The National Trial Lawyers organization. Sullivan has a proven record of defending people from all walks of life, faiths and countries in courts throughout Texas.

Call James Sullivan at 281-546-6428 for  a confidential consultation.

Texas Penal Code, Section 15.04 – Renunciation Defense

CHAPTER 15. PREPARATORY OFFENSES
§ 15.04.  RENUNCIATION DEFENSE.
(a)  It is an affirmative defense to prosecution under Section 15.01 that under circumstances manifesting a voluntary and complete renunciation of his criminal objective the actor avoided commission of the offense attempted by abandoning his criminal conduct or, if abandonment was insufficient to avoid commission of the offense, by taking further affirmative action that prevented the commission.
(b)  It is an affirmative defense to prosecution under Section 15.02 or 15.03 that under circumstances manifesting a voluntary and complete renunciation of his criminal objective the actor countermanded his solicitation or withdrew from the conspiracy before commission of the object offense and took further affirmative action that prevented the commission of the object offense.
(c)  Renunciation is not voluntary if it is motivated in whole or in part:
(1)  by circumstances not present or apparent at the inception of the actor’s course of conduct that increase the probability of detection or apprehension or that make more difficult the accomplishment of the objective; or
(2)  by a decision to postpone the criminal conduct until another time or to transfer the criminal act to another but similar objective or victim.
(d)  Evidence that the defendant renounced his criminal objective by abandoning his criminal conduct, countermanding his solicitation, or withdrawing from the conspiracy before the criminal offense was committed and made substantial effort to prevent the commission of the object offense shall be admissible as mitigation at the hearing on punishment if he has been found guilty of criminal attempt, criminal solicitation, or criminal conspiracy; and in the event of a finding of renunciation under this subsection, the punishment shall be one grade lower than that provided for the offense committed.

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